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-   -   need help with rear suspension setup with different mounting holes on various parts (https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forums/354-440-race-modified/257187-need-help-rear-suspension-setup-different-mounting-holes-various-parts.html)

mr.prox 10-07-2007 09:45 PM

ill just say that i have messed with them before, but there was always something else that changed at the same time (shocks, track etc.) i ride mostly moderate ditching banging when at home in minnesota, and off trail deep as must as i can when im out west or anywhere theres good snow. i assume in a perfect world i would want 2 setups with different mounting positions of each of these riding styles. thatnks for any help in advance, so here we go.


lets start with front torque arm mounting to the rail. what changes when using one or the other of the 2 holes provided in the arm and the rail?
https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forum...1684_10385.jpg
https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forum...1684_53208.jpg

next the middle link. what changes when this mounting position is moved?
https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forum...1684_48982.jpg

and the rear sissor lower mount on the rail.
https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forum...6_1684_730.jpg

and the transfer rods. there is 3 possible combos with these the way i see it for length, and 3 mounting holes by the upper rear shock mount as well. whats the changes from each of them?
https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forum...1684_51558.jpg
https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forum...1684_32556.jpg

akiqpilot 10-07-2007 09:58 PM

Only if you bring your little friend in your avitar back...

mr.prox 10-07-2007 10:18 PM

i cant upload anything directly to the forums. i tried putting her on another site and the url is too long. ill bring her back as soon as they fix the forum uploads.

i only hope somebody can explain it, im getting sick of pulling the skid to change stuff and put it back in ride it, and start over again. hoping to find a good setup for both my riding styles or a good one for each atleast.

fufanu360 10-07-2007 10:54 PM

ooo i REALLY would like a good explanation on this one!!! i would like to play around with these things but only if i know whats going to happen

timespentsearching 10-07-2007 11:04 PM

id like to know more to tom so fill us in.

SofaKing 10-08-2007 11:35 AM

9 Attachment(s)
Here's my little friend below in my sig. Now help him Tom! LMFAO :>P

akiqpilot 10-08-2007 12:22 PM

We covered this in the ProX forum about a year ago. Every adjustment was discussed with a lengthy write-up. Ha...imagine that.

I looked for about 1/2 hour last night but couldn't find it, the pictures would be missing anyway but at least I wouldn't have to type it all again.

Lets discuss one section at a time and we will use Mr.ProX's Pics. If you have a question about a specific section just do a reply to that section.

So here goes.

In this picture the Front Torque Arm (FTA) is mounted to the rail using the back hole in the rail and the back hole in the Arm. Stock for an IQ is the front hole in the Arm and front hole in the rail. Many ProX skids are mounted like shown in this picture. Some ProX rails only have the rear hole drilled in the rail and a pilot hole is for the front position. It can be drilled out if the other hole becomes damaged. If you use the front hole in the rail you must use the front hole in the FTA.

The affects of the two positions go like this. In the front mounted position there is less leverage working against the shock. This provides a stiffer ride to the front of the skid. The front of the skid is more resistant to impacts on the FTA. BUT, in this position the rail is held slightly more off the ground. So using this position will improve the FTA ability to take a hard impact from a bump but the rail is not quite a parrallel to the ground.

In the rear mounted position the FTA has more leverage to work against the shock, the FTA and shock can't respond quite as well to hard direct impacts but it provides for a slightly softer ride when hitting bumps with the front of the skid. on the plus side the rails are slightly flatter to the ground in this position.

The forward position would help the front of the skid absorb a bump and the rear mounting position would help the skid transfer weight a little better under acceleration.

The difference in ride quality is pretty minimal. It's fairly hard to tell the difference in either of these positions when beating down the trail. The Primary reason someone would change this mounting position is if one set of mounting holes in the rail were wollered out from the bolt threads. So if your rails holes are all wallered out you can use the other position and get your skid back in top shape.

SofaKing 10-08-2007 12:29 PM

9 Attachment(s)
Quote:

We covered this in the ProX forum about a year ago. Every adjustment was discussed with a lengthy write-up. Ha...imagine that.

I looked for about 1/2 hour last night but couldn't find it, the pictures would be missing anyway but at least I wouldn't have to type it all again.

Lets discuss one section at a time and we will use Mr.ProX's Pics. If you have a question about a specific section just do a reply to that section.

So here goes.
In this picture the Front Torque Arm (FTA) is mounted to the rail using the back hole in the rail and the back hole in the Arm. Stock for an IQ is the front hole in the Arm and front hole in the rail. Many ProX skids are mounted like shown in this picture. Some ProX rails only have the rear hole drilled in the rail and a pilot hole is for the front position. It can be drilled out if the other hole becomes damaged. If you use the front hole in the rail you must use the front hole in the FTA.

The affects of the two positions go like this. In the front mounted position there is less leverage working against the shock. This provides a stiffer ride to the front of the skid. The front of the skid is more resistant to impacts on the FTA. BUT, in this position the rail is held slightly more off the ground. So using this position will improve the FTA ability to take a hard impact from a bump but the rail is not quite a parrallel to the ground.

In the rear mounted position the FTA has more leverage to work against the shock, the FTA and shock can't respond quite as well to hard direct impacts but it provides for a slightly softer ride when hitting bumps with the front of the skid. on the plus side the rails are slightly flatter to the ground in this position.

The forward position would help the front of the skid absorb a bump and the rear mounting position would help the skid transfer weight a little better under acceleration.

The difference in ride quality is pretty minimal. It's fairly hard to tell the difference in either of these positions when beating down the trail. The Primary reason someone would change this mounting position is if one set of mounting holes in the rail were wollered out from the bolt threads. So if your rails holes are all wallered out you can use the other position and get your skid back in top shape.[/b]
Well.......there you go.

akiqpilot 10-08-2007 12:50 PM

This is the lower center link or pivot. Shown in this picture is the stock mounting position, the center hole. As the rear of the skid compresses this pivot arm moves forward in an arch. In fact as the Rear Track Shock (RTS) compresses the bottom of the shock is moving away from this compression, kinda running away from the shaft as it rushes forward and down.

Changing this mounting position changes the shaft speed of the RTS at the beginning and end of it's travel

If you change the mounting position of this center link to the rearward hole you are positioning the bottom of the RTS closer to the top of that arch. As the RTS starts to compress the bottom of it moves away at a high rate of speed. As the RTS gets closer to bottoming out the arch is not as effective because it can't run away from the shock. As the RTS gets closer to its total compressed length the shaft speed increases. So the first few inches of RTS compression has a slow shaft speed but as the shock continues to move the shaft speed increases. In essance the first few inches of rear skid travel will be softer but as the skid compresses it will get progressively firmer throughout its total movement. This is commonly referred to as a Raising Rate Dampening.

If you change to the forward hole just the opposite happens for the exact same reasons. As the RTS compresses the pivot arm is moving up before it starts to run away from the shock. The inital shaft speed is increased but as the shock gets further into its total travel the shaft speed decreases. Shock shaft speed gets progressively slower as the shock compresses. This is commonly referred to a Falling Rate Dampening.

The middle position on the center link offers a shaft speed that is nearly the same in the first inch of travel as it is in the last inch.

This center link adjustment can offer advantges when setting up the skid for max weight transfer or max bump absorbtion. It can offer a stiff ride in the first few inches of travel or a much softer ride in the first few inches of suspension travel.

I use the middle position for most all occasions but you could experiment if you want.

akiqpilot 10-08-2007 01:03 PM

This is the lower pivot arm on the Rear Torque Arm (RTA). Shown in the picture is the stock mounting position, the center hole. Changing this mounting hole affects weight transfer and coupling.

Weight transfer is the skids ability to squat and compress under acceleration. To a point, more weight transfer improves acceleration because the skid squats and as the front of the sled raises up more weight is loaded on the track which should improve acceleration as long as the track isn't spinning.

Coupling is when both the front and rear shocks compress together. If coupling is set to maximim, both shocks will compress even if you just hit a bump on the very back of the rail. There is front to rear coupling and rear to front coupling but that subject gets even deeper so for this discussion lets just say Coupling.

If you move to the front hole in the rail you will increase weight transfew but decrease coupling. your skid will squat and accelerate better but it won't be able to take big bumps as well.

If you move to the rear hole in the rail just the opposite happens. Your skid will not transfer and accelerate as well but it will absorb the big bumps better because the front shock helps out sooner in the compression of the skid.

The center is a good position because it offers a ballance between decent weight transfew and good bump absorbtion.


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